My four years using Ubuntu

This post has been a long time coming. I have always intended to write a post on how fantastic Ubuntu was, why I like using it, and why I believe it is miles better than any version of Windows. Especially, Windows 10 if you value privacy and usability highly.

Ubuntu is a free open-source operating system a flavour of Linux, which means anyone can see, test and edit the code. Whereas Windows and MacOS are closed source and propriety.

Since my early college days when I first heard of the new(ish) Ubuntu project and seeing how it functioned, I was intrigued.

Back then installing Ubuntu 6 was tricky work, but I had ordered the free CDs and distributed them around college. Including one to a very interested technician in the IT department, I did have a play around with it on an old system but I found the learning curve a bit steep back then. The operating system was also more complex than the current versions today.

Then came 2016

I had started a masters and could not get work completed on my old iPad. I made an investment in a laptop built by PCSpecialist, the Lafite 2. You can choose to have an operating pre-installed, but I knew I had to have Ubuntu.

From that point forwards, I have had no other operating system but Ubuntu on my laptop since purchasing it at the end of 2016.

The experience has been one of learning and simple amazement. Installing Ubuntu 16.04 was much simpler. The install process was much more of a breeze than I experienced back in 2006.

The lockups and blue screens of death of Windows no longer occurred. The overall stability and reliability of the operating system was astonishing.

Usability had vastly improved from the previous version of Ubuntu I had used. The unity desktop environment and particularly the heads-up display, saved me time whether it was file searching or looking for that app I installed. There was a learning curve, especially with regards to the Linux terminal but it was not too steep. I was able to download and install iPlayer videos and use software such as Zotero referencing very easily.

Since then, I have upgraded to Ubuntu 18.10, 19.04, 19.10 and most recently as of April version 20.04.

One of the big things about using Ubuntu over other Linux distros for me is the community. Including the extensive support and information available on the internet.

Anytime I broke something, wanted to customise something, or wanted to install an app, a simple search online revealed all and the Ubuntu community helped no end.

Then came 20.04

An Ubuntu version like no other!

That is not to say 16.04 was not great (the first distribution I used) it’s just 20.04 polished over an exceptionally smooth product 😊

First, there was the boot up time (major improvement) over 16.04. It is something I noticed right away. Small performance improvements which mean apps load even faster.

Second, the new icons, fewer clicks between important functions, night light.

Third, snaps. I am still on the fence about this but I think this will improve in time and aid how apps are installed. I rarely download apps from the Ubuntu store, I prefer to go to the source anyway.

I may have missed something. I will add it in if I remember. Overall, everything in Ubuntu just works. Word processing, web browsing and emailing. I only go back to my Windows desktop for gaming.

I still do miss the unity heads up display, though, I understand it was rarely used.

As Ubuntu 20.10 is due to be released next week, I can only see yet more improvements.

I will not be installing 20.10 as it is not a long-term release (LTS). Ubuntu releases long term stable versions every three years, with new features in point releases that are supported for 9 months.

Here’s to more Ubuntuing! 🤓